Tag Archives: Arizona fishing

JANUARY, 2012 – FISHING JOURNAL

9 Feb

Before you read this month’s report, get in the mood by watching our video of rainbow trout being stocked at Red Mountain Lake, Mesa, Arizona (trout supplied by Crowther’s Fresh Water Trout) by clicking this  link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EPHyCIdmStY

The above stocking was a “super incentive trout stocking” with trout up to six pounds!

Arizona, Valley Of The Sun, January, 2012, this month is represented by two words – Rainbow Trout. The cooler temperatures allow for the regular stocking of beautiful (and tasty) farm-raised rainbows. Without further adieu, here’s this month’s submission.

LOWER SALT RIVER, Tonto National Forest, AZ

Lower flows again allow for very enjoyable days to be spent fishing the Lower Salt River. Take your time, pack a backpack and enjoy exploring stretches of the river that are otherwise inaccessible in the summer months when flows are high.

This month's hot pattern's a # 16 Ju-Ju Bee nymph fished behind a # 12 Chartreuse Wooly Bugger

Below is the water flow chart for the Lower Salt River for the month from WWW.Watershedmonitor.Com.

URBAN LAKE FISHING

Sunrise at Veteran's Oasis Lake, Chandler, AZ

The Siren’s call of “rainbow trout” once again calls anglers to these urban treasures. Conveniently located and well stocked, the lakes provide fun angling. In these hard economic times, the lakes also supply a nutritious food source and the satisfaction of having caught your own supper. I tend to frequent Veteran’s Oasis Lake, Water Ranch Lake and Red Mountain Lake.

Once again, please remember the daily bag limit of four rainbow trout. Harvest what you will consume and return excess fish so that others may enjoy them.

Now, for a bit of humor, here’s a look at “Historical Fishing”. Enjoy

Until the next submission, I remain,

Sensei John

Sensei John is available for lectures on the interrelationship of fly fishing and martial arts protocol, ideology and philosophy. Please see the “LECTURES & LESSONS” Page tab above for more information.

You can now arrange for either a fly fishing lecture or lesson with Sensei John, please see the “LESSONS & LECTURES” Page tab above.

You can follow the DAILY adventures of FLY FISHING DOJO on FACEBOOK, See the Video & Media Page for details.

Please feel free to shop unique Fly Fishing Dojo products wear by clicking on the “SHOP” tab at the top of this page. This months new product

FFD LOGO MINI WALLET

Here is a convenient link to this month’s featured product – http://www.cafepress.com/flyfishing_dojo.594046850#

Please feel free to view my other weblog dedicated to exploring martial arts ideology and concepts as they can be applied to daily life. You may visit the weblog at WWW.SENSEIJOHN.WORDPRESS.COM.

DECEMBER 2012 – FISHING JOURNAL

10 Jan

Before you read the report, get in the mood by watching our video of rainbow trout being stocked at Red Mountain Lake, Mesa, Arizona by clicking this  link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EPHyCIdmStY

Stocking rainbow trout, Red Mountain Lake, Mesa, AZ

Arizona, Valley Of The Sun, December, 2011, was a busy time here in the low desert. Holiday preparations and (fortunately) work kept me busy and not on the water as much as usual. There were some memorable mornings on the water that gave life to the saying, “Quality not quantity.” The morning of December 10th was a spectacular lunar eclipse that was truly memorable. In addition, several mornings I woke to unbelievable fog that enveloped my fishing experience in an erie aura.

Before I submit this month’s report, I found an interesting quote from Ernest Hemingway which you may wish to, shall we say, “chew on.”

Of course, it could never be considered an equal contest (between man & fish) unless the angler had a hook in his mouth, as well as the fish. But insistence on that might discourage the sporting fisherman entirely.” (See Endnote # 1)

PLEASE NOTE: Unless otherwise indicated, all fish were safely released after being photographed.

LOWER SALT RIVER, Tonto National Forest, AZ

I am always amazed at the way this river changes with its seasonal use and functionality. The summer months see increased demand for the river’s water both for occupational (such as power and irrigation) and recreational use (such as fishing and most notably water float-tubing). After the heat of summer dissipates, flows are severely decreased and the hidden treasures of the river are, I believe, truly reveled. With the decreased flows, river accessibility greatly increased. Equally so, the ability to find and fish otherwise remote hotspots is made easy. Having said that, the decreased river flows can mean that stealth and caution when fishing may be needed.

For a point of comparison, here is a photograph taken in June from a video shoot for my Sanchin For Everyone DVD. (See endnote # 2).

Here is almost the same location this month.

You can see even more dramatic views of the Lower Salt River and listen to John Lennon’s stirring “Stand By Me” by clicking this video link to a promotional video used to promote the Sanchin DVD filmed at the Lower Salt River. Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h3MFNsl4mWg

Below is the water flow chart for the Lower Salt River for the month from WWW.Watershedmonitor.Com.

CANYON LAKE, Tonto National Forest, AZ

Due to other commitments, I spent little, if any time at Canyon Lake. As I type this report, I can only imagine the fishing opportunities that I missed. I look optimistically forward t next month and fishing this “big” lake. My optimism is buoyed by the rumor that improvements at Boulder Recreation Area have been completed and the area is again open.

URBAN LAKE FISHING

VETERAN’S OASIS PARK LAKE, Chandler, AZ

Most of my fishing this month was at this, my favored, Urban Lake. The significance of the Urban Lake system is it’s ready access. Located in every major urban area, the lakes and surrounding parks provide easy and readily accessible access to the beauty of nature and through the stocking program reliable access to fish for the table.

Please see to it that the treasure of the urban lakes is not taken for granted; obey all applicable rules (including respecting areas off limits to fishing), don’t litter (there is nothing as intolerable as fishing debris) and respect the harvest quotas. I too love taking home a catfish or two in the summer months and a trout or two in the winter months. But, respect daily bag limits; there will always be more tomorrow or the next day for every fisherman if limits are respected.

      Trout for Supper    

WATER RANCH LAKE, Gilbert, AZ

Here’s a bit of video footage from Water Ranch Lake that I used to promote my Sanchin Kata To Improve Everyone’s Health Campaign. Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ncZJ0s0HNI

For more information of the physical & spiritual health benefits of Sanchin & how to purchase my economically priced 1 hour Sanchin DVD, please visit either my website: http://www.dynamic-meditation.com/references.html or blog WWW.SenseiJohn.Wordpress.Com – the blog also contains numerous articles and videos and is regularly updated.

NEW VIDEOS:

I submit this video under the category of “just-for-the-fun-of-it”. It is a video of a Harley-Davidson Electra-glide motorcycle ride through the cotton fields of my neighborhood used as a promotion for my Sanchin For Everyone DVD. Give the following link a click, and “throw a leg over your bike” and come for a ride. Link:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lNbDxDHvlL8

Until the next submission, I remain,

Sensei John

Please feel free to shop unique Fly Fishing Dojo products wear by clicking on the “SHOP” tab at the top of this page or this link,http://www.cafepress.com/flyfishing_dojo This month’s featured product – THE FFD PUZZLE

FFD Logo Puzzle

ENDNOTES:

1. Ernest Hemingway from: Lyons, Nick, Hemingway On Fishing, (Nick Lyons Press, New York, NY, 2000) p. 148, originally published as “the Great Blue River” in Holiday magazine, July, 1949.

2. Here is a link to a FREE Sanchin For Everyone promotional video on You-Tube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J-pC-tPUrYE  You can find information on how to purchase a Sanchin DVD & Book by clicking the following convenient link:http://www.dynamic-meditation.com/references.html

Sensei John is available for lectures on the interrelationship of fly fishing and martial arts protocol, ideology and philosophy. Please see the “LECTURES & LESSONS” Page tab above for more information.

You can follow the DAILY adventures of FLY FISHING DOJO on FACEBOOK, See the Video & Media Page for details.

Please feel free to view my other weblog dedicated to exploring martial arts ideology and concepts as they can be applied to daily life. You may visit the weblog at WWW.SENSEIJOHN.WORDPRESS.COM.

NOVEMBER, 2011 – FISHING JOURNAL

14 Dec

 Arizona, Valley Of The Sun, November, 2011,  cooler temperatures, serene environments and the wonder of nature made for a month of enjoyable fishing.

Decreased water flows at Lower Salt River (Blue Point Beach)

Sunrise - Veterans Oasis Lake, Chandler, AZ

With the Holiday season upon us, I extend to you a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.As a small gift, here is a video clip I made of the Fly Fishing Dojo Christmas HO Train layout set to Joe Nichols “Old Toy Trains”.

Scene from the Christmas Trains FREE video - link below

I hope you enjoy it. LINK: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M__4r1qAavU

Please feel free to visit the FLY FISHING DOJO “SHOP” page for unique Fly Fishing Dojo Logo Christmas themed and fly fishing products.

      

PLEASE NOTE: Unless otherwise indicated, all fish were safely released after being photographed.

LOWER SALT RIVER, Tonto National Forest, AZ

Water Users Recreation Area

Rainbow trout stockings resumed on the Lower Salt River with bountiful results. Thanksgiving Day proved to be a most productive day on the river with catches (and releases) of largemouth bass and rainbow trout.

             

            

Prior to its release, Chloe inspects a small bass

All fish were released except for two rainbows harvested as a tasty alternative to turkey leftovers.

The best fly pattern on that day was a sparkle shad streamer with a # 16 chartreuse/red scrambled egg nymph.

Always aesthetically pleasing, there was one uniquely special day on the Lower Salt River when we were visited by a herd of wild horses.

Experience this special day for yourself; here is a link to a video made on that day. Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qT491X5vea8

Below is the water flow chart for the Lower Salt River for the month from WWW.Watershedmonitor.Com.

CANYON LAKE, Tonto National Forest, AZ

With falling temperatures, catches of largemouth bass along the various shorelines were replaced with catches of newly stocked rainbow trout.

The Boulder Recreation Area was closed for renovations. As such, most of our fishing was along the shoreline along the first one-lane bridge.

URBAN LAKE FISHING

The beauty of Urban Lake Fishing

Rainbow trout were stocked for the first time this year on November 17th. Stockings will continue every other week; however, the exact dates will not be known prior to the stocking. With biweekly stockings, there are plenty of tasty rainbows for supper.

PLEASE, remember the daily bag limit of four AND you need an Urban Fishing License.

Regular visits to our favorite Urban Lakes, to wit: Veteran’s Oasis Lake, Water Ranch Lake and Red Mountain Lake proved enjoyable and productive.

NEW VIDEOS:

WILD HORSES (At the Lower Salt River, AZ): Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qT491X5vea8

CHRISTMAS TRAINS (To “Old Toy Trains” by Joe Nichols): Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M__4r1qAavU

For a very unique look at a historical aspect of fishing, you may wish to view “Fisherman As Warriors” by clicking this convenient link, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-cMRW503DbY

Until the next submission, I remain,

Sensei John

Sensei John is available for lectures on the interrelationship of fly fishing and martial arts protocol, ideology and philosophy. Please see the “LECTURES & LESSONS” Page tab above for more information. You can now arrange for either a fly fishing lecture or lesson with Sensei John, please see the “LESSONS & LECTURES” Page tab above.

You can follow the DAILY adventures of FLY FISHING DOJO on FACEBOOK, See the Video & Media Page for details.

Please feel free to shop unique Fly Fishing Dojo products wear by clicking on the “SHOP” tab at the top of this page.

Please feel free to view my other weblog dedicated to exploring martial arts ideology and concepts as they can be applied to daily life. You may visit the weblog at WWW.SENSEIJOHN.WORDPRESS.COM.

FISHING & PHYSICAL CONDITIONING

15 Nov

Is physical conditioning applicable to fishing? The short answer is a resounding, “YES.” Further, I submit that an easy approach to physical conditioning is found in a Karate-based procedure known as “Sanchin.”

Sanchin Kata at the Lower Salt River, Arizona

As you may see in this video, filmed while fishing at Water Ranch Lake in Gilbert, Arizona, Sanchin is easily incorporated into your fishing regime.

I am always intrigued by the lack of physical conditioning of fisherman. Perhaps, the weekend angler may find an excuse in the fact that the sport of fishing, from his perspective, is merely an escape from the banality of the grind of everyday life. Assuming that such justification is correct, then, one may assume that at the opposite end of the fishing spectrum, that of the competitive tournament angler, the physicality of fishing would be of importance. Once again, I am surprised at how little a role one’s state of physical conditioning plays in fishing, even at this competitive level.

When I address physicality or the lack thereof, I refer to a minimum or slightly above minimum level of physical conditioning. I do not refer to athleticism in terms of being able to achieve physical feats above the status quo level of physical performance. Rather, I refer to the fact that many anglers fail to achieve their full fishing performance potential because they find themselves out-of-breath from a minimum level of physical exertion, suffering from aching joints, including the back, knees and ankles, from standing for so-called “extended” periods of time, suffering from aching shoulders, wrist and elbows from numerous casts and the like.

The question then, is how to achieve this level of physical conditioning without entering into a strict physical training regiment? Clearly, the stricter the training regiment, the less appealing it is to one who partakes of a “sedentary” activity such as fishing, even competitive fishing. The answer is relatively simple. First, maintain a physical existence in your daily life, second, physically prepare your self to fish, third, breath properly and efficiently and fourth have correct posture. Sanchin is the ONE procedure that incorporates all of these factors and more. Further, Sanchin takes less than three minutes to perform. SANCHIN can be performed regularly by ANYBODY, ANY PLACE and at ANY TIME. By instituting a simple regime of Sanchin, you will achieve an enhanced level of fishing-physicality.

I submit that if an angler pays attention to achieving a minimal level of physical conditioning, then the burden of the physicality of fishing will not impede their ability to achieve a level of performance that exceeds the stats quo. The idea that an angler should pay attention to the physicality of the sport of fishing is far from new or novel. Ernest Hemingway was not only a great writer, he was an avid outdoorsman and fisherman.

Big Game Fishing – a Hemingway favorite

He was acutely aware of the need, not for athleticism, but for good physical conditioning of fisherman. In an article entitled “The Great Blue River” published in 1949 in Holiday magazine, Hemingway had these observations and comments surrounding the state of big game fisherman.

. . . I have never lost a marlin nor a tuna to a shark. . . We try to fight them fast, but never rough. The secret is for the angler to never rest. Anytime he rests the fish is resting.

So now, say, you have this marlin down thirty feet, pulling as strong as a horse. . . He is as strong as a horse. Treat him like a horse. . . . You do not have to kill a horse to break him. You have to convince him, and that is what you have to do with a truly strong, big fish. . . To do this you have to be in good condition.

You have to be a fisherman, or at least in very good shape. . .  You don’t need to be an athlete. . You ought to be in good condition . . .

In almost any other sport requiring strength and skill to play or practice, those practicing the sport expect to now how to play it, to have at least moderate ability and to be in some sort of condition. In big game fishing they will come on board in ghastly shape, incapable of reeling in 500 yards of line, simply line, with no question of there being a fish on it, and yet full of confidence that they can catch a fish weighing twice or three times their weight. (See Endnote # 1).

Whether you are fishing from the shore, or a boat, fishing for trout or tarpon, you need to acquire a minimum degree of physical conditioning to enhance your fishing experience as a weekend angler, or “put more dollars in the livewell” as a competitive angler. Sanchin is an easy, convenient means of attaining that level of physical conditioning. Until the next article, I remain,

Sensei John

HOW TO PURCHASE THE SANCHIN KATA DVD OR BOOK:

for purchase information, please visit my website at http://www.dynamic-meditation.com/references.html

ENDNOTES:

1. Lyons, Nick, Hemingway On Fishing, (Nick Lyons Press, New York, NY, 2000) p. 146-149, originally published as “The Great Blue River” in Holiday magazine, July, 1949.

Sensei John is available for lectures on the interrelationship of fly fishing and martial arts protocol, ideology and philosophy. Please see the “LECTURES & LESSONS” Page tab above for more information.

Follow FLY FISHING DOJO on FACEBOOK, please send a friend request on Facebook; see our “Video & Media” Page for more information.

You are also invited to read my martial arts protocol, philosophy and ideology weblog for non-martial artists at WWW.SenseiJohn.Wordpress.Com.

OCTOBER, 2011 – FLY FISHING JOURNAL

4 Nov

Arizona, Valley Of The Sun, October, 2011, a wonderfully enjoyable month of fishing thanks to comfortable temperatures and the start of fall stocking by AZ Fishing and Game. The frequency of days spent on the water was less than preferred due to promotion, personal appearances and seminars related to my Sanchin Kata For Everyone DVD project (additional information is at the end of this article).

Jacket Art for my Sanchin Kata For Everyone DVD

As I enter November which marks the start of the stocking of rainbow trout, I have made a promise to myself to spend more time on the water notwithstanding my Sanchin commitments. PLEASE NOTE: Unless otherwise indicated, all fish were safely released after being photographed.

LOWER SALT RIVER, Tonto National Forest, AZ

Once again, the Lower Salt River returned to a natural state after being trod upon all summer by rafters, kayakers, swimmer, and beer swilled inhabitants. Pending trout stocking, fishing for bass was plentiful with bountiful bluegill and occasional carp.

    

With a few parking areas closed for the winter, it is often necessary to hike to your favorite fishing location. I find that the hike adds to the anticipation of the fishing experience and the desire to have a tug at the end of your line.

A welcome rain on the Lower Salt River

Below is the water flow chart for the Lower Salt River for the month from WWW.Watershedmonitor.Com.

CANYON LAKE, Tonto National Forest, AZ

Bass and panfishing was exceptional during October. Topwater action was extremely exciting. I was often thrilled with the results experienced by casting a dry deer hair frog amongst the reeds and rocks.

One planning note involves the Boulder Recreation Area. On two occasions, this area was closed for improvements; so, if you plan to fish at this location, there is a possibility you may be disappointed. On the two days the area was closed, I used the closing as an opportunity to scout locations that I had not fished and was pleasantly surprised.

Exploring Canyon Lake

SAGUARO LAKE, Tonto National Forest, AZ

Bass and panfish were also plentiful at Saguaro Lake. I did notice; however, that topwater, dry fly action was not as fruitful as at Canyon Lake. Having said that, my usual fly rig of a streamer (sparkle shad or muddler minnow) as a head fly and wet fly or nymph (bloody mary, red serendipity, rainbow warrior0 as a tail fly did not disappoint.

URBAN LAKE FISHING

October fishing at the urban lakes meant one species – catfish. While most of the our fishing took place at Veteran’s Oasis Park (Chandler, AZ), we also fished at Water Ranch Lake (Gilbert, AZ) and Red Mountain Lake (Mesa, AZ).

      

FEATURED VIDEOS:

For a very unique look at a historical aspect of fishing, you may wish to view “Fisherman As Warriors” by clicking this convenient link, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-cMRW503DbY

Until the next submission, I remain,

Sensei John

For additional information on my Sanchin DVD, here is a link to a free promotional video on You-Tubehttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J-pC-tPUrYE

Sensei John is available for lectures on the interrelationship of fly fishing and martial arts protocol, ideology and philosophy. Please see the “LECTURES & LESSONS” Page tab above for more information.

You can follow the DAILY adventures of FLY FISHING DOJO on FACEBOOK, See the Video & Media Page for details.

Please feel free to shop unique Fly Fishing Dojo products wear by clicking on the “SHOP” tab at the top of this page. This months new product – FFD LOGO CHRISTMAS ORNAMENT

You can obtain theis month’s product by clicking this convenient link: http://www.cafepress.com/flyfishing_dojo.459912530

Please feel free to view my other weblog dedicated to exploring martial arts ideology and concepts as they can be applied to daily life. You may visit the weblog at WWW.SENSEIJOHN.WORDPRESS.COM.

AUGUST, 2011 – FLY FISHING JOURNAL

9 Sep

Arizona, Valley Of The Sun, August, 2011, a record-breaking month for the State of Arizona. No, the largest fish wasn’t caught. August was the hottest month ever in the history of Arizona; there were 33 days all summer with temperatures exceeding 110 degrees. Reminds me of a quote by the literary and fishing master, Ernest Hemingway.

No one can work everyday in the hot months without going stale. To break up the pattern of work, we fish . . .  (See Endnote # 1).

For my part I mixed fishing pleasure with the business of filming my Sanchin Kata for non-martial artists DVD. I used various locations in Tonto National Forest, and my favorite fishing locations at the Lower Salt River, Canyon Lake and Saguaro Lake, as background for the videos. Here is a link to a free promotional video on You-Tube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J-pC-tPUrYE

Well, with cooler months in the near future, let’s proceed with the “hot” fishing report.

PLEASE NOTE: Unless otherwise indicated, all fish were safely released after being photographed.

LOWER SALT RIVER, Tonto National Forest, AZ

I fished several locations on the Lower Salt River that were not readily intruded upon by float tubers. These areas included up river from the Water Users Recreation Area and down river from Phon D. Sutton Recreation Area. Fly fishing produced small to mid-size largemouth bass, mostly on # 12 muddler minnows and a few on # 12 sparkle shad streamer. In both instances, I fished a nymph behind the streamer. The top producer for the month was a # 14 bloody mary nymph and a # 16 red serendipity nymph. There was definitely something about the color red provoking strikes in the bass.

Small bass on a Rebel Pop-R - up river from Water Users Rec Area

In addition, during filming of the DVD, the videographer had caught a few carp drifting a hook baited with corn kernels downstream. Something different to break up shooting video footage in one-hundred degree plus temperatures.

Filming video for the DVD at Phon Sutton. 106 Degrees but the river was cool.

Without a doubt, I am looking forward to being on the Lower Salt in cooler temperatures with decreased water flows and the return of rainbow trout stockings.

Di with another bass taken on a muddler minnow

Below is the water flow chart for the Lower Salt River for the month from WWW.Watershedmonitor.Com.

CANYON LAKE, Tonto National Forest, AZ

I fished my preferred locations, including Boulder Recreation Area, roadside locations along Highway 88 and the shoreline around the first one lane bridge with moderate success. Moderately sized panfish were prevalent with respectable catches of largemouth bass.

I even hooked into one catfish that, for whatever reason, known only to the fish itself was induced to strike at a # 12 apache lady wet fly. The whiskered fish eventually ducked under a log and broke my 5X tippet.

SAGUARO LAKE, Tonto National Forest, AZ

Due to the time constraints of shooting video, my only visits to Saguaro Lake were for filming purposes. Many a morning I looked longingly at the shoreline wishing I could flick a fly or two; but, alas, duty and responsibility called, and so, the task of the day was performing Sanchin for the video camera. Now that the DVD is completed and available to the public, my “irresponsible” self can again settle down to the task of fishing at this lake.

Tough fishing? Try the FFD STUNT FISH!

URBAN LAKE FISHING – GENERAL COMMENTS

With the hectic video shooting schedule, I was only able to visit two of my favorite Urban Lakes. I’m anticipating cooler temperatures and the stocking of catfish starting in the middle of September by Arizona Fish and Game.

VETERAN’S OASIS PARK LAKE, Chandler, AZ

I feel I neglected regularly visiting my favorite lake in the Urban Lake system as I only fished it about twice. The best time was early morning when, in addition to bluegill, bass could be caught and released on a fly.

The most productive pattern proved to be a # 16 black serendipity tied in line behind a # 12 apache lady wet fly.

WATER RANCH LAKE, Gilbert, AZ

This lake seems to be recuperating from the harshness of July. Bluegill and small bass could be taken on various nymph and wet fly combinations. This seems to be a good indication of promising fishing to come in the cooler months.

FEATURED VIDEOS:

BLOODY MARY BASS, a nice sized largemouth that decided to sample a bite of a # 14 bloody mary nymph. Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8COsXhjoKTc

SANCHIN KATA FOR FLY FISHERMAN: Filmed at Water Ranch Lake in Gilbert, AZ, this video was designed for the fly fisherman prior to the release of my Sanchin Kata DVD. Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ncZJ0s0HNI

FISHERMAN AS WARRIORS: For a very unique look at a historical aspect of fishing, you may wish to view “Fisherman As Warriors” by clicking this convenient link, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-cMRW503DbY

This months featured FFD logo product is shown below. With cooler temperatures forecasted for the coming months, I thought you may find a need to “heat things up.”

Until the next submission, I remain,

Sensei John

ENDNOTES:

  1. Ernest Hemingway from:Lyons, Nick, Hemingway On Fishing, (Nick Lyons Press, New York, NY, 2000) p. 153, originally published as “As Situation Report” in Look magazine, September 4, 1956.

Sensei John is available for lectures on the interrelationship of fly fishing and martial arts protocol, ideology and philosophy. Please see the “LECTURES & LESSONS” Page tab above for more information.

You can now arrange for either a fly fishing lecture or lesson with Sensei John, please see the “LESSONS & LECTURES” Page tab above.

You can follow the DAILY adventures of FLY FISHING DOJO on FACEBOOK, See the Video & Media Page for details.

Please feel free to shop unique Fly Fishing Dojo products wear by clicking on the “SHOP” tab at the top of this page. This months new product  FFD LOGO CLASSIC THONG

– only $ 9.99 plus delivery.

Here’s a convenient link: http://www.cafepress.com/flyfishing_dojo.459914580#

Please feel free to view my other weblog dedicated to exploring martial arts ideology and concepts as they can be applied to daily life. You may visit the weblog at WWW.SENSEIJOHN.WORDPRESS.COM.

JULY, 2011 – FLY FISHING JOURNAL

4 Aug

Arizona, Valley Of The Sun, July, 2011, Monsoon season is officially underway. So far this has meant mostly dust storms and very little rain.

Superstition Mountains "Flatiron" the morning after a record-setting dust storm

Please remember that during the summer month’s it is extremely important that you carry enough water for you and all members of your fishing party. Suffice to say that dehydration and heat-related illnesses will quickly spoil an otherwise enjoyable day of fishing. Failure to carry enough water and exercise caution when hiking the shoreline has unpleasant consequences; there’s always a few residents of the waters that wait for you to make a mistake.

                   

PLEASE NOTE: Unless otherwise indicated, all fish were safely released after being photographed.

LOWER SALT RIVER, Tonto National Forest, AZ

Success on the Lower Salt River was sporadic and highly influenced by the amount of pressure from float tubers. As such, I started exploring areas up river from the Water Users Recreation Area and down river from Phon D. Sutton Recreation Area.  These areas are outside the boundaries of commercial tubing operations. Fishing often involved casting in and about tight places, off of rock ledges and sometimes more hiking than casting flies.

There were catches of trout and small bass, but not as exciting as the quantity and size of fish to be found in the cooler months.

         

Water flows remained high, but started to settle down to normal summer flows.

Below is the water flow chart for the Lower Salt River for the month from WWW.Watershedmonitor.Com.

CANYON LAKE, Tonto National Forest, AZ

Canyon Lake proved, again, to be a go-to place for the month. Regular catches of bluegill and fair sized bass could be found in several areas, including both sides of the first one lane bridge on highway 88, all around Boulder Recreation Area (fishing the bridge was good, but also try hiking all around the area, there are many fine locations to be found) and several areas located off highway 88.

Best of all in the mid-morning, usually between eight o’clock and ten o’clock, there was great top water action to be had. For bass, deer hair poppers worked best twitched, “popped” and paused along the surface. For the bluegill and crappy, a small # 16 grasshopper and # 16 foam ant delicately twitched and paused on the surface could not be beat. For non-fly fisherman, rebel “Pop-R” lures worked best during this time.

This nice bass was the result of top water action courtesy of a deer hair popper.

In addition to the top of the water action, once again, several sub-surface combinations proved effective, including a # 14 apache lady wet fly with a # 16 red serendipity nymph tied behind it, # 12 muddler minnow with either a # 16 rainbow warrior nymph or a # 16 peacock lady tied behind it. Fishing the apache lady and red serendipity combination off the fishing bridge at Boulder Recreation produced fun largemouth bass action when the bass came out from under the bridge to take the little # 16 red serendipity.

 a video link is below  

We were able to capture some of the action on video, here is a convenient link to our video entitled “Serendipity Bass.”  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mlYgmOSpbts

                   

SAGUARO LAKE, Tonto National Forest, AZ

With favorable results at Canyon Lake, we decided to see how the action at Saguaro Lake was. We found several good locations both on the two fishing bridges and along the shoreline adjacent to and between the bridges. Use extreme caution when hiking down from the parking lot to the shoreline when fishing in between and adjacent to the bridges themselves.

The successful fly patterns were the same as Canyon Lake for both top water and sub-surface fishing. Di also had top water success again with the Rebel Pop-R’s and sub-surface action on small “Swimmin’ Squirt” tube baits on a 1/32 ounce jig head by Bass Pro Shops.

    Bass – and – More Bass   

URBAN LAKE FISHING – GENERAL COMMENTS

The Urban lakes System is one of the best means of introducing a child to fishing. Unlike the larger bodies of water, where you may have to hike to a good fishing location, contend with natural inhabitants, bees, and snakes, to name a few the Urban Lake System provides a “user-friendly” environment for a child take catch their first fish.

My grandson, Stratton, age 2, practices his fishing skills

VETERAN’S OASIS PARK LAKE, Chandler, AZ

Fly fishing was slow, but I did notice a few bait fisherman with respectable catfish catches. I also once again noticed quite a few bass cruising the shoreline. These cruising bass were easily spooked and hard to catch using flies.

WATER RANCH LAKE, Gilbert, AZ

As I indicated in my June fishing report, this lake was once inundated with algae. I am very happy to report that when I revisited the lake on July 16th, water clarity was greatly improved. Small largemouth bass and bluegill could been seen from shore.

Given these positive signs, I look forward to anticipated good fishing in August.

RED MOUNTAIN LAKE, Mesa, AZ

Walking the shoreline and fishing as I do allowed me to regularly see respectable sized catfish and largemouth bass; sometimes within inches of the shoreline. In addition bluegill were regularly seen. Water quality was very clear and care had to be exercised in approaching these fish as they were easily spooked.

Good bass fishing could be found along the reed laden sides of the off-shore islands. Due to limited fly casting opportunities caused by the shoreline vegetation, I opted for a bait-casting bass pole and had good success with a top water Rebel Pop-R cast very close to the reeds and “popped” along the surface. Watch for a ravenous attack when the lure is paused prior to the net pop. Here’s a photograph of one bass caught using the Rebel Pop-R in this fashion

We were also able to get some video footage of two bass; the video is entitled “Red Mountain Bass.” Here is a convenient link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wqiMVWBkNLg

OTHER:

DISCOVERY LAKE, Gilbert, AZ

I paid an exploratory visit to this lake on July 13th. There were several small bass fry that were interested in taking a # 16 wire caddis tied behind a # 14 claret wooly bugger. While I was elated by the prospects of good bass fishing in the fall, after the fry have had a chance to grow, I was disappointed to find a dead bass which must have been caught and carelessly discarded into the water flow from the upper lake to the lower lake.

I can not emphasize enough that in order for this small lake to produce quality fishing, care must be exercised in catching and releasing fish. Any negligence will result in fishing decreasing faster than the Dow Jones Average on Wall Street.

NEW VIDEOS:

SERENDIPITY BASS, Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mlYgmOSpbts

BLOODY MARY BASS, Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8COsXhjoKTc

RED MOUNTAIN BASS, Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wqiMVWBkNLg

For a very unique look at a historical aspect of fishing, you may wish to view “Fisherman As Warriors” by clicking this convenient link, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-cMRW503DbY

Until the next submission, I remain, fishing the Arizona desert known as “The Valley Of The Sun”,

Sensei John

Sensei John is available for lectures on the interrelationship of fly fishing and martial arts protocol, ideology and philosophy. Please see the “LECTURES & LESSONS” Page tab above for more information. You can now arrange for either a fly fishing lecture or lesson with Sensei John, please see the “LESSONS & LECTURES” Page tab above.

You can follow the DAILY adventures of FLY FISHING DOJO on FACEBOOK, See the Video & Media Page for details.

Please feel free to shop unique Fly Fishing Dojo products wear by clicking on the “SHOP” tab at the top of this page. This months new product – FLY FISHING DOJO Coffee Mug –

     Convenient link: http://www.cafepress.com/FLYFISHING_DOJO.459912522

Please feel free to view my other weblog dedicated to exploring martial arts ideology and concepts as they can be applied to daily life. You may visit the weblog at WWW.SENSEIJOHN.WORDPRESS.COM.

JUNE, 2011 – FLY FISHING JOURNAL

8 Jul

Arizona, Valley Of The Sun, June, 2011, with summer rising upon us like the dawning sun, fishing in the Arizona desert crept along at an arduous pace. By the end of the month triple digit temperatures, more often than not exceeding 105 degrees, became the norm. The were a few consistent days that exceeded 110 degrees. This made for hot fishing, not necessarily meaning fast, consistent catches.

All species of fish, including, bass, perch, catfish, bluegill, crappy and trout,  could readily be seen cruising shallow waters or rising to the surface to feed. Some of the fish were of legendary proportion; at least large enough to brag about over a cold drink. Being seen is one thing being hooked another. Bluebird skies, and clear, calm water often made for difficult fishing that emphasized delicate presentation to the finicky feeders. When all factors converged, there was a reward at the end of the line that provided a respite from the heat. A joining of man and fish at the end of a line for a moment or two until each returned to their natural environment; the fish to the water and the man to the shore.

It’s too hot for more literary metaphors, so onto this month’s report

PLEASE NOTE: Unless otherwise indicated, all fish were safely released after being photographed.

LOWER SALT RIVER, Tonto National Forest, AZ

With the Salt River Tubing season in full swing, I fished certain sections of the river early in the morning and moved on to more remote (and not open to tubing) sections after nine o’clock when tubing gets under way. For areas unaffected by tubing, please consult one of the many online map resources. Also exercise caution as many of these areas involve varying degrees of hiking. Make sure you have an ample supply of drinking water.

I would note that the week of June 20th was the last stocking of rainbow trout for the summer.

At the Phon D. Sutton Recreation area I found small bass and trout that were willing to take a fly. That is until morning temperature soared and it was time to put down the fly rod and take a swim.

While wooly buggers and various nymphs produced with satisfactory results, the best combination I found was a # 16 tan scud tied behind a # 14 bead head (bh) rooks blueberry nymph.

At Water Users Recreation area, the same combination produced well. Occasionally, I had action on a dry fly with a # 16 foam ant, #16 foam beetle and # 16 bee. For my non-fly fishing readers, I note that Di had a few medium bluegill on a white swimmin’ squirt tied on a 1/32 ounce jig head.

With the fast water flow, I preferred to fish the lower salt river with my two longest fly rods, an 8 foot, Fenwick Ferrulite Rod and my monster-caster, a 9 foot, Sumo Distance XS fly rod.

Below is the water flow chart for the Lower Salt River for the month from WWW.Watershedmonitor.Com.

CANYON LAKE, Tonto National Forest, AZ

Fishing at Canyon Lake provided a regular opportunity to catch largemouth bass and panfish of various species on flies.  Depending on water conditions, depth, wind and temperature, these species regularly roamed from deep water to shallow water to almost hugging the shoreline. As such, the best locations were those where a shallow shelf fell off to deep water. I have several of these type of locations in my geographic arsenal. These location range from the area surrounding Boulder Recreation area to various locations along State Highway 88. When fishing these roadside locations, caution must be exercised when hiking down to the lake. Remember that hiking down to the shoreline is easier than hiking up from the shoreline. Also remember the natural invasive inhabitants, bees, snakes, and such, along the path and keep a watchful eye for them.

My fly rod of choice for fishing Canyon Lake and targeting pan fish is my ultra-light 6 foot Fenwick Ferrulite fly rod. I also fished the 9 foot Sumo Distance XS to throw larger flies in and around bass locations.

The most productive fly patterns were determined by adaptability. Conditions changed often with the increasing heat. However, it seemed that in the morning hours, a nymph tied behind a streamer and fished from deep water to shallow, twitched and paused, produced the best. The most popular patterns were a # 14 or 16 bead head (bh) tan caddis nymph tied behind a # 10 bh claret wooly bugger, a # 16 bh rainbow warrior nymph tied behind a # 10 apache lady wet fly and a small wet or nymph (# 16 red serendipity nymph, # 16 juju bee nymph or a # 16 red ass wet fly) tied behind a # 10 sparkle shad streamer. The sparkle shad seemed to get the attention of the fish who then took the smaller trailing fly.

              

On June 10th, I was fortunate to hook two panfish at once on my 6 foot Fenwick Ferrulite fly rod using a #16 wired caddis black/pink nymph tied behind a # 12 claret wooly bugger. There is a link to the video entitled “Double panfish” below and on the VIDEO & MEDIA page tab above.

As morning progressed and temperatures warmed, dry fly action could be fast and furious. I had the most success wit # 16 and # 18 foam ants. Again, I fished the dry flies with my 6 foot ultra-light Fenwick Ferrulite fly rod, a 9 foot leader with a 7X or 8X tippet.

              

I began to experiment using large saltwater flies to catch the many large bass I could see cruising the shoreline.

The bass would often chase these flies but not take them. I began to tie on a smaller trailer fly and was very surprise that while the bass would flash and chase the large fly, they ultimately took the smaller fly. I was able to get video and photos of one such bass that flashed on a # 10 sparkle shad streamer but took a small # 14 bh bloody mary nymph that was the trailer fly.

I saw this bass cruising the shoreline (in the area of the first one lane bridge on Highway 88). He was only in about 5 inches of water! I slowly twitched the flies with long pauses to allow fly to sink. I saw the bass turn and take the nymph off the rocky bottom.Below is a photo and there is a link to the video entitled “Bloody Mary Bass” at the end of this report and on the VIDEO & MEDIA page tab.

For those readers who are not fly fisherman, Di was able to regularly catch all species of panfish on either Gulp maggots or Bass Pro Shops’ “Swimmin’ Squirt” soft plastic tube in red/sparkle and sparkle colors on a 1/32 painted jig head.

URBAN LAKE FISHING – GENERAL COMMENTS

This month saw the last stocking of catfish into the Urban Lake System until September.  My fly rod of choice for the urban lake system is my versatile 7 1/2 foot Cortland Pro Crest fly rod. It is light enough to make pan fishing enjoyable and sturdy enough to handle the occasional bass.

VETERAN’S OASIS PARK LAKE, Chandler, AZ

Maybe it was the great fishing on the big waters, but my experiences at this lake in June often were not slow, but, S-L-O-W. I often wondered, “Where are the fish?” This has left me more determined to fish this lake more frequently in July.

Based upon last summer, when I had many memorable mornings at this lake, I anticipate better fishing.

WATER RANCH LAKE, Gilbert, AZ

I fished Water Ranch on June 8th and was shocked to have other fisherman give me reports of dead catfish from a recent stocking and green algae.

I walked the shoreline casting about and fished my preferred spots with some determination, but there was nothing to be seen or enticed. When I was leaving, I saw a clean-up boat arriving. The crew was going to prowl the vegetation and remove any remaining dead fish and otherwise clean the lake.

After seeing the above, I had not fished this lake for the remainder of the month. Given my fond memories of fishing this lake last summer, I will make a point of making a few trips to the lake in July.

RED MOUNTAIN LAKE, Mesa, AZ

Fishing Red Mountain was somewhat slow although several large bass was seen very close to shore. Several smaller bass were caught on various nymphs and streamers that had some sparkle to their pattern. Di also had success with the Gulp maggots.

NEW VIDEOS:

BLOODY MARY BASS, Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8COsXhjoKTc

DOUBLE BLUEGILL (2Flies – 2 Fish), Link:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVZlgyR1zb8

IMPROVE YOUR HEALTH – check out the “Sanchin Kata For Fisherman” Video, link:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ncZJ0s0HNI

July teaser, without jinxing future success, largemouth bass action has been hot in July. As of this posting several nice-sized bass and one over five pounds, have been caught on various flies.

While you will have to wait for the full July report, you can preview a video of a bucket mouth caught on a small, size 26 red serendipity nymph at Canyon Lake, by clicking the following link, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mlYgmOSpbts

Until the next article, I hope you continue to enjoy reading FLY FISHING DOJO and may your lines be tight. I remain,

Sensei John

Sensei John is available for lectures on the interrelationship of fly fishing and martial arts protocol, ideology and philosophy. Please see the “LECTURES & LESSONS” Page tab above for more information.

You can now arrange for either a fly fishing lecture or lesson with Sensei John, please see the “LESSONS & LECTURES” Page tab above.

You can follow the DAILY adventures of FLY FISHING DOJO on FACEBOOK, See the Video & Media Page for details.

Please feel free to shop unique Fly Fishing Dojo products wear by clicking on the “SHOP” tab at the top of this page.

This months featured product — FFD LOGO MOUSEPAD

Here is a convenient link to purchase http://www.cafepress.com/FLYFISHING_DOJO.459912527

Please feel free to view my other weblog dedicated to exploring martial arts ideology and concepts as they can be applied to daily life. You may visit the weblog at WWW.SENSEIJOHN.WORDPRESS.COM.

OCTOBER, 2010 FLY FISHING JOURNAL

1 Nov
Arizona, October, 2010, at long last we are rewarded for enduring summer with moderate temperatures. A result is that fishing is more enjoyable and productive. Without further adieu, here is of Fly Fishing Dojo’s fishing journal for October.

 PLEASE NOTE: Unless otherwise indicated, all fish were safely released after being photographed.

 
 LOWER SALT RIVER, Tonto National Forest, AZ

Cool temperatures and consistent water flows made for enjoyable mornings on the Lower Salt.

Sensei John on the Lower Salt

 Catches and releases of largemouth bass, bluegill and trout were enjoyed. The favorite areas were Sheep Crossing and Phon D. Sutton.

The most productive fly patterns were (Streamers) # 14 Wooly Buggers in black and claret, # 12 and # 14 Muddler Minnows, (Nymphs) # 14 Gold ribbed Hare’s Ear, # 16 Rainbow Warrior, (Wet Fly) # 14 Alexandria, # 14 Red Ass, (Dry Fly) # 14 Foam Dragonfly (blue), # 14 Purple Haze-parachute, # 16 Mosquito and # 16 Adams.

Below is the water flow chart for the Lower Salt River for the month of October from WWW.Watershedmonitor.Com.

CANYON LAKE, Tonto National Forest, AZ

The cooling temperatures meant less shoreline swimming and picnicking activity. This resulted in more shoreline access for fly fishing. Though Fly Fishing Dojo was only able to fish two days on this lake, the results were more than satisfying. Fishing a dry # 14 Foam Dragonfly one particular morning was difficult, but produced a breathtaking fishing experience. The fish were actually jumping from the water to catch low-flying, mating dragonflies. You would have to calculate where the mating pair would set down on the water and cast within close proximity. As soon as the fly hit the water – BAM – you had better be ready to set the hook or you would have an empty hook coming right at you.

I fished the dragonfly close to reeds as pictured above. With shoreline cover, you had to make use of a water-loaded roll cast. If you timed the cast with the living dragonflies, you were sure to entice a fish; hooking it was a different story.

Fly Fishing Dojo also shot its first test video footage on this lake. Hopefully, during November we will soon begin to have video coverage of the topics and reports submitted on this weblog.

URBAN LAKE FISHING – GENERAL COMMENTS

The urban lake system continued to provide convenient, accessible fishing. Catches of bluegill and largemouth bass started sluggish, but increased steadily as the month progressed. The bait fisherman I talked to reported nice catches of the recently stock, farm-raised, catfish. The third week of October saw a stocking of bluegill and small to medium largemouth bass. The recently stocked fish were skittish at first. After a few days of acclimating to their new surroundings, they became eager to take a fly. Such eagerness resulted in one memorable morning at Water Ranch Lake.

Trout fisherman can look forward to the Fall/Winter stocking of farm-raised rainbow trout which will begin the end of November.

Except as noted, the most successful fly patterns remained those previously mentioned.

VETERAN’S OASIS PARK LAKE, Chandler, AZ (See Note # 1)

Due to its close proximity, I continued to be able to fish this lake at least twice a week. I never have a disappointing day at this lake. Fly fishing this lake will, at a minimum, produce steady catches of bluegill. Call me simple, but on a day when I only have an hour and a half to two hours to fly fish, I would rather catch and release a few bluegill than catch nothing at all.

WATER RANCH LAKE, Gilbert, AZ (See Note # 1)

Water ranch produce steadily; however, catches of largemouth bass seemed to fall off at the beginning of the month. After the recent stocking, fishing improved.

On Friday, October 26th, I had a dazzling morning of fly fishing at the Water Ranch. I arrived at the lake about seven in the morning. I only had about two hours to fish and was really in the mood for consistent action catching at least bluegills. I tied on my favorite brace of exploratory flies, a # 14 McGinty wet fly on the head and a # 14 Rainbow Warrior nymph on the tail. I walked to one of my favorite starting points adjacent to a bank of reeds and started fishing. After about six casts, I was disappointed; usually my choice of flies would produce at least a bluegill. I decided to take one more cast and move on when I noticed a silver streak in the water pursuing but not taking the flies. The streak was larger than a bluegill so I decided to change flies to something larger and perhaps more appetizing. I hoped that the prospect of a more satisfying meal would provoke a strike from the mysterious flash of silver. I tied on a # 14 Claret Wooly Bigger on the head followed by a # 14 Apache Lady wet fly on the tail. On the very next cast, a decent size largemouth bass had kissed the Apache Lady and was hooked. Clearly, there was no need to move so I continued casting. For the next two and one half hours, I steadily caught and released largemouth bass ranging in size from seven inches to twelve inches and numerous bluegill. I took “a few” photographs of the fish for this weblog. I arrived home and discovered I had downloaded nineteen pictures of bass released and eight pictures of bluegill released. I didn’t even take a picture of every fish caught. What a morning!

   

I had a fly fishing lesson to give at dusk that same day. I called the student and changed the scheduled location of the lesson to Water Ranch. At 5:00 pm, I arrived and met the student. The location I fished in the morning was taken, so we walked to the section where water enters the lake from the recharge basin. After a fifteen minute lesson, the student was roll casting and retrieving the same brace of flies sufficiently well enough to land four largemouth’s. The size was about ten inches on average, but to that first time fly fisherman it was a delight. I knew she was hooked on fly fishing.

Di now happily addicted to fly fishing

 

DISCOVERY PARK LAKE, Gilbert, AZ

Though not aesthetically pleasing, from a fly fishing viewpoint, this lake continued to produce well. Again, due to its small size, the only way that this lake will continue to provide good fishing is through conscientious management via a catch and release system.

I had two memorable days at this lake. The first was on Saturday, October 2nd when I finished working and desired some sunset fly fishing. After a half hour, a dust storm began to move in. The winds and dust soon made fly fishing impossible.

As this bass was caught & released, the dust arrived.

 

The dust & wind arrived ending fly fishing.

The second memorable day was Thursday, October 14th when my youngest daughter, Kim, arrived for a visit from New Jersey. After she unpacked we were able to get 2 fast hours of successful catch and release fishing in.

                     

 

OTHER COMMENTS:

Due to time constraints, I was unable to visit the following lakes previously reported, Red Mountain Lake in Mesa and Cosmo Lake in Gilbert. I will make an effort to fish these lakes next month and report.

Until my next submission, I hope you continue to enjoy the articles I post on this weblog. Keep your flies in the water. Fly Fishing Dojo is now on Facebook; Please see the Video and Media Page tab above.

Sensei John

NOTES:

1. These lakes are part of the Arizona Urban Fishing Program. The program which provides man-made fishing lakes in close proximity to major population centers is celebrating its 25th anniversary.

Please feel free to shop unique Fly Fishing Dojo logo wear by clicking on the “SHOP” tab at the top of this page.

Please feel free to view my other weblog dedicated to exploring martial arts ideology and concepts as they can be applied to daily life. You may visit the weblog at WWW.SenseiJohn.Wordpress.Com.

SENSEI, SONS AND DAUGHTERS

19 Oct

 Within the context of the traditional Martial Arts of Okinawa and Japan, the term Sensei is a title steeped in honor and is bestowed upon one who is commonly known in the western world as a “Teacher”. When the term Sensei is parsed into its two root words, a more distinctive interpretation is revealed. The root word “Sen” means “Before.” The root word “Sei” means “Being“, as in a physical presence. Thus, Sensei literally means (a) “Before-Being“, or, one who came before me. Thus, a martial arts teacher (Sensei) came into his martial knowledge before the student. (See Endnote #1). 

In terms of familial relationships, a parent is, in effect, a Sensei of their child.
For Sensei Bob and me, in addition to being a chronological Sensei to our children, we were also Goshin-Do Karate Sensei to our children. Each of our children, to varying degrees studied Goshin-Do Karate. Sensei and I are also fishing Sensei as we introduced our children to the pleasure of fishing. This is the story of our recent fishing adventures.    

SENSEI BOB’S SALMON RIVER ADVENTURE

 Sensei Bob and his two sons, Trevor and Devon recently undertook a Salmon fishing adventure in upstate New York. As every parent knows, as your children grow older, the demands of work, education and their own desire for independence result in less time spent together. Sensei Bob and his boys enjoyed each others company during a nice weekend of fly fishing on the Salmon River in New York.

Sensei Bob displays one of the many trophy sized salmon.

 All three are accomplished fly fisherman and anticipated stalking the large salmon known to inhabit this river. By the end of the weekend, father and sons had many new fish tales to remember.

Devon displays another trophy lured to a fly.

It is such moments of sharing, bonding and enjoying each other’s company that are retold countless times in years to come. I am sure that when Sensei’s boys have children of their own, they will tell them their tales of stalking large salmon; of a time spent with a grandpa, who is a fisherman and a Sensei. On Sensei’s part, not only will he recount the tales of the mighty salmon with a future grandchild, inevitably he will also bestow upon his child’s child the secret knowledge of Goshin-Do Karate. Goshin-Do Karate and fly fishing, secret arts, passed from Sensei to son to son’s son.

In a photo from days long past, Trevor displays another trophy.

 SENSEI KIM’S DESERT FISHING ADVENTURE

In mid-October, I was elated by an extended weekend visit from my youngest daughter, Sensei Kim. As with her sister, Jessica, Kim not only fished with me, but also studied Goshin-Do Karate. Kim spent 16 years studying Goshin-Do. When I relocated to Arizona, she assumed the day-to-day operations of the Issho Dojo.

Sensei Kim made a point that, in addition to visiting and Karate training, she wanted to fish in the Arizona desert. We were able to visit many of my favorite fishing locations, including Veteran’s Oasis Lake, Dog Park, Discovery Lake, and the “big” lakes, Apache Lake and Canyon Lake.

A family night spent fishing.

Although Kim, Jess and I have many fishing tales in our collection, including, falling out of boats, a seashell being dropped on Kim by a flying seagull and cutting her, fishing poles disappearing into the depths of water, mishaps with car doors and the inevitable “one that got away”, we added a few more this weekend. With the hotter than normal temperatures the primary catches (and subsequent releases) were bluegill, largemouth bass and catfish. The effect of these catches were memorable smiles, laughs, and a special, heretofore unknown “dance of joy” displayed by Sensei Kim as she landed a nice largemouth in the dark of evening. One to tell the grand-kids.

As she was reeling in this bass, Sensei Kim erupted into the infamous “dance of joy.”

Until the next article, may you all be fly fishing Sensei to your children,

Sensei John

ENDNOTES:

1. In the dedication to my book, Sanchin Kata: The Gateway To The Plateau Of Human Serenity, I propose the following more embellished definition of “Sensei”:

The Honored One who came into mysterious, secret, knowledge before me and grudgingly bestows his mysterious teachings upon, a yet unworthy, me.

Please feel free to view my other weblog dedicated to exploring martial arts ideology and concepts as they can be applied to daily life. You may visit the weblog at WWW.SenseiJohn.Wordpress.Com.

SEPTEMBER, 2010 – FLY FISHING JOURNAL

1 Oct
Arizona, September, 2010, Temperatures “cooled” to a high in the lower triple digits with cool mornings in the high seventy, low eighty degree range. With cooler morning temperatures, not only was fishing physically more enjoyable, but the results greatly improved. Unfortunately, during the last week of September, temperatures again surged to almost record high. The corollary increase in morning temperatures again resulted in smaller catches. I hope you enjoy the within journal as much as I enjoyed “researching” it. REMEMBER – ALL FISH WERE SAFELY RELEASED AFTER BEING PHOTOGRAPHED.
LOWER SALT RIVER, Maricopa County, AZ

Due to the Lower Salt River flowing too high and too fast for my tastes, I did not fish the river in September. For purposes of consistence in my fishing reports, here is the water flow chart for September from WWW.RiverMonitor.Com.

URBAN LAKE FISHING – GENERAL COMMENTS

With the cooler morning temperatures, fishing in the urban lake system steadily improved throughout the month. Bluegill were plentiful and provided consistent fun on light fly equipment. My outfit of choice for these tempting little fish morsels remained my six foot Fenwick Ferrulite rod, a double taper, five weight floating line and a nine foot leader ending in a 7X tippet. It is axiomatic that bluegill readily take a fly. My flies of choice for these bluegill generally fell into the sub-surface category and involved fishing the flies double in a head to tail configuration. The specific sub-surface patterns that I favored were a # 14 McGinty, # 14 March Brown, # 14 San Juan Worm, # 16 Rainbow Warrior*, and # 16 Ju-Ju Bee*. There was also early morning action on dry flies. My patterns of choice consisted of a # 16 purple Haze*, # 16 Mosquito and a # 16 Adams Irresistible. For those of you who are unfamiliar with the patterns indicated by an asterisk (*), they may be obtained though Big Y Fly Co at WWW.BigYFlyCo.Com.

To my extreme gratification, Bass fishing greatly improved. In the beginning of the month, small bass could be taken on using the light fly tackle described above.

Early September, temperatures exceed 105 degrees.

As the month progressed, not only did the size of the largemouths increase, the tenacity with which they fought after being hooked amplified. After breaking a fair number of larger bass off the 7X tippet, I modified my fishing strategy. I began to bring two fly rods to the lakes. The first fly outfit I carried with me was the ultra-light outfit mentioned above. I supplemented that outfit with a sturdier outfit designed to catch a larger bass for photographing and subsequent release. My outfit of choice for these larger bass was my nine foot Sumo Distance XS fly rod casting a seven weight floating weight forward line with a nine foot leader ending in a 4X tippet.

Slowly, the size of bass caught increased.

I employed two strategies to find and catch the bass that these lakes had to offer. The first strategy was to locate bluegill using the lighter tackle. Inevitably the excitement of the hooked bluegill would draw a larger bass out of cover. Once a larger bass was sighted, I switched to my heavier tackle. The second strategy was to walk the lake shore with the Sumo XS at the ready and sight fish for bass. This sight fishing strategy is similar to wading salt water flats and sight fishing, only instead of wading, it involves walking the soil and/or concrete walkways of my urban lakes. Again, similar to the salt water flats, once a bass is sighted, an exacting cast, with accurate and delicate presentation often resulted in the satisfaction of a bass hook-up.

I used this sign as an impromptu measuring device before releasing this bass.

My flies of choice for the larger bass included # 14 Wooly Bugger (in caret color), # 12 Muddler Minnow, # 12 Lite Brite Zonker*, # 12 Alexander*, # 14 San Juan Worm and # 10 Silver Epoxy Minnow Streamer. Again, I fished these flies double. I also had a few heart stopping thrills using a dry # 14 Foam Dragonfly. The colors blue and tan produced the best. The dragonfly had to be well presented with no ripple to be effective. When so presented the strikes were fast and almost instantaneous. Once the fly hit the water – Bam, the game was afoot.

Bass could not resist a well presented Foam Dragonfly.

Arizona Fish and Game stocked catfish during the week of September 20th and provided bait fisherman with ample opportunity to take home a catfish or two. Anglers are encourage to selectively harvest the catfish. Di was able to catch a few that we subsequently harvested. The meat of these fish was clean and tasty.

Di before releasing this urban catfish.

With the sun setting earlier in the sky, I began to fish the Urban Lakes at sunset. Ernest Hemingway once observed that “The setting of the sun is a difficult time for all fish” (See Endnote # 2). Perhaps this is so because, as the sun descends to sleep, fish shed natural inhibition and will readily take a well presented fly, or even, artificial lures.

           Bass at Sunset          

VETERAN’S OASIS PARK LAKE, Chandler, AZ (See Note # 1)

Early in the month was the start of dove hunting season. I spent many early mornings on this lake casting to the rhythmic pow-pow of hunters shooting at their tasty quarry. Mid-month early mornings provided the slightest whiff of steam coming off the lake close to the reed beds. Bass fishing was somewhat sporadic with some mornings being better than others. The morning of September 14th provided me with a classic example of how the martial arts state of mind called “Mushin” can be of benefit to fly fisherman. Using this state of mind, I was treated to sight-fishing two back-to-back largemouths as I walked the lake shore. The subject of the martial arts state of mind called “Mushin” and fly fishing will be addressed in my next article.

Bass loved a Muddler Minnow.

WATER RANCH LAKE, Gilbert, AZ (See Note # 1)

Fly fishing this lake was satisfying with consistent catches of bluegill and a few small bass. In addition, I was privileged to view nature’s spectacular awakening and subsequent slumber at sun rise and sunset.

Nature prepares to sleep at the Water Ranch.

The magnificence of nature’s display was diminished by the increasing amount of trash and waste being left lakeside by those that pretend to call themselves “fisherman”. No-one who takes the noble title of “fisherman” would denigrate the sport with such lazy, selfish acts of pollution. The sad part is that these lazily, slovenly lake visitors carried the trash with them and after use, simply discarded it. Garbage consisted of off-the-shelf fishing rod cases, folding chairs, worm containers and an assortment of drinking bottles. In one instance, a broken chair was thrown into the lake. The people that left their garbage certainly are not qualified to call themselves “fisherman”. They clearly have no idea of what it feels like to loose a natural resource to careless pollution. Stop for a minute and think about what this particular park would be like if the lake was too polluted to fish in, and the trails were over run by garbage and the vermin that seeks such garbage. Look well.

WHAT A WASTE!

RED MOUNTAIN LAKE, Mesa. AZ (See Note # 1)

This lake was the slowest of all lakes in the urban system that I visited. Perhaps this was due to fishing pressure or perhaps due to limited catch and release philosophy. I do not know the exact cause. I like to think that October will be better for this lake.

DISCOVERY PARK LAKE, Gilbert, AZ

This small lake, or perhaps I should say pond reminds one of a backyard swimming pool. It is one of the most fruitful ponds for fishing excitement for its limited size.

Having said that, it MUST be nurtured and cared for. There must be careful resource management and a MANDATORY catch and release policy for this pond to continue to temporarily surrender it‘s bounty. Enjoy it as you will, but, please think of the future and carefully release all fish from this facility.

Sensei John takes a line from the Godfather movie - not quite "Sleeping With The Fishes".

COSMO LAKE, Gilbert, AZ

September 20th was my first visit to this lake. I visited it a few times thereafter. It produced bluegill consistently. I also had a thrill of catching a carp on a # 14 Rainbow Warrior but “quick-released” it about a foot from shore. I will continue to explore this lake in the coming weeks.

Until my next submission, I hope you continue to enjoy the articles I post on this weblog. Keep your flies in the water.

Sensei John

NOTES:

1. These lakes are part of the Arizona Urban Fishing Program. The program which provides man-made fishing lakes in close proximity to major population centers is celebrating its 25th anniversary.

2. From, Hemingway, Ernest, The Old Man And The Sea, (Simon & Schuster, New York, NY 1952), p. 73. Also Hemingway On Fishing, Lyons Nick (Editor), (Nick Lyons Pres, New York, NY, 2000) p. 222. You may see my review of Hemingway On Fishing by clicking on the Sensei’s Reviews category.

Please feel free to shop unique Fly Fishing Dojo logo wear by clicking on the “SHOP” tab at the top of this page.

Please feel free to view my other weblog dedicated to exploring martial arts ideology and concepts as they can be applied to daily life. You may visit the weblog at WWW.SenseiJohn.Wordpress.Com.

AUGUST, 2010 FLY-FISHING JOURNAL

7 Sep
Arizona, August, 2010, summer monsoon season was upon us, not only was it hot, but humid as well with dew point readings very high. The National Weather Service posted excessive heat warnings and excessive ozone warnings almost daily. Weather was not fit for fish or fly-fisherman. Fishing may best be described as a sweat-filled quest for sporadic fish. Due to the heat and other factors, I was only able to average 2 ½ days a week of fishing.
I knew that the size of any species caught would be getting smaller and smaller as the heat grew worse. So, to compensate, I adjusted my tackle accordingly. My equipment for the urban lakes was a 6 foot ultra-lite Fenwick Ferrulite Rod ( 2 5/8 grams), a Panther-Martin # 63 lite reel, Cortland 444 floating 5 weight double taper line and at least a 9 foot leader ending in an 8X tippet. In addition, I finished field testing a new rod. The review will be posted shortly.
At least in the coming weeks, I can look forward to temperatures below 100 degrees and hopefully better fishing. I hope the following fishing journal encourages you to beat the heat and wet a fly.  

Veterans Oasis Lake, August 29th seeing a distant hot air balloon stirs memories of cooler temperatures.

LOWER SALT RIVER, Maricopa County, AZ

With the heat and humidity, tubing pressure was great on the Lower Salt. As such, I usually ended my mornings of fishing by 10:30 or 11:00 am. Fishing was sporadic at best. Catches were mainly bluegill and small bass. There was dry fly action to be found in the early morning, particularly between the hours of 5:30 and 6:30. The two patterns that produced were a # 16 Adams Irresistible and a # 16 Purple Haze (parachute style hackle). Fishing conditions was so difficult that I often drafted my dog Chloe, a fish-finding Min-pin, to act as a guide.

Chloe helps locate fish on the Lower Salt River.

The deviation in water flows were less dramatic than in July, but there was an occasional spike or two. Here is the August water flow chart for August obtained from WWW.Watershedmonitor.Com.

Lower Salt River water flows for August, 2010.

My equipment list for the Lower Salt generally included longer rods. I used either a 7 ½ foot Cortland Pro-Crest or an 8 foot Fenwick Ferrulite. I also interspersed a 9 foot rod that I was field testing. With all three rods I used a Cortland Pro-Crest reel throwing a # 6 floating weight forward line. My leader was always 9 foot ending in an 8X tippet.

On the Lower Salt River wearing the official Fly-fishing Dojo logo T-shirt.

 URBAN LAKE FISHING – GENERAL COMMENTS

Many of the people I have met while fishing the Arizona Urban Lake Program are surprised to see a fly-fisherman. Most people that I encounter fishing these lakes are bait fisherman and a few make use of artificial lures. The majority find a spot on a lake, set up shop and generally spend most of their time fishing in that one spot. They may fish in another spot or two before calling it a day.

My SUMMER tactic for the urban lake program is to cover as much water as possible. It is a tactic that goes back to my days of tournament bass fishing. During those days I would cover water fast with either a spinner bait or a crank bait until fish were found and then fish productive water slowly. Applying that concept to fly-fishing, I quickly cover water with a double set-up of wet flies and nymphs to find fish.

Patch from my time as a member of the Bassing America Grand National Tournament Circuit.

Generally, once at my desired lake, I fish my “honey-holes” first and begin to make my way around the lake. In this manner, I can cover the entire shoreline of a lake in about 1 to 1 ¼ hours. It is “aerobic fly-fishing”. During this stage I am looking for bluegill. If I find that bluegill are present, then I concentrate my fishing for any bass that are present. I especially concentrate around the reeds that are found in the lakes, sub surface vegetation and the moving water found at the point at which the lake is filled via the recharge system. The goal is to find an catch a few bluegill. The thrashing of the caught fish excites the remaining bluegill and usually lures a bass or two out from within the reeds. Then the trick is to entice the bass to the fly.

VETERAN’S OASIS PARK LAKE, Chandler, AZ (See Note # 1)

As my “go-to” fishing location, this lake still produced, but it took some work. Bluegill were always plentiful and eager to take a fly, including a few dry flies. As the heat increased throughout the month, the bluegill provided the only tug on my line. Early in the month, average size bass could be seduced into taking a variety of flies ranging from size 14 Woolly Buggers, # 14 Tellico nymphs, size 16 Ju-ju Bee nymphs and wet flies in the Adams, Blue Dun and March brown patterns in size 14.

August 4th an average size bass on a # 14 Woolly Bugger.

As the month progressed, lake levels fell and the size of bass taken dramatically decreased.

Veterans Oasis Park Lake levels by August 17th were low.

By 7:15 most mornings, I was already soaked with sweat from walking the lake looking for first bluegills and then the bass that hopefully were within the same location. On the ultra-lite equipment and tippet, even small fish made the hot mornings semi-bearable.

A small bass poses with the Fly Fishing Dojo logo

WATER RANCH LAKE, Gilbert, AZ (See Note # 1)

Water and fishing conditions on this lake were generally like the conditions at Veterans Oasis Park. I will note that the bluegills found at Water Ranch tended to be more aggressive. On a few occasions, I actually landed doubles. Admittedly, the fish were small, but again with morning temperatures skirting triple digits, relatively high humidity and ultra-lite equipment, even a double of small bluegill are fulfilling. Hey look at it this way, it beats sitting home.

Small bass on a # 16 Adams Irresistible Dry Fly fished close to the reeds.

One highlight of my fishing at Water Ranch is looking for the large Koi that inhabits this lake. This Koi, which is well over 24 inches is a bit of an urban legend. I nicknamed the Koi “Oishi” after the leader of the rebellion by the 47 Ronin.

Water Ranch Lake. The urban legend on film - a rare photo of the Koi I call “Oishi”.

Another highlight of my fishing was meeting the noted author, Al Schneider. Al is another former New Jersey resident who found his way out west to Arizona. He would come by often and we would talk a bit as I fished. One day he surprised my with a signed copy of his breakout book, There’s A Better Place. Thanks Al. It is definitely a recommended read.

Many thanks, Al. See you next week.

DISCOVERY PARK LAKE, Gilbert, AZ

I found about this lake from a friend. It is the newest park and lake constructed. It was finished in or around December 2009. My understanding is that it will be part of the Arizona Urban Fishing Program. There are two man-made lakes at the park. Both are relatively small. These lakes differ from the other Urban lakes that I fish. The lakes mentioned above have a natural bottom and mostly natural shoreline with a portion being concrete walkway and access points. The lake in Discovery Park appears to have a concrete bottom. On the two visits to this lake, I was able to temp small bass into taking a fly. Like a fine wine, fishing and size should improve with aging.

Small bass on a # 16 Wet March Brown.

Until my September report, I hope you continue to enjoy the articles I post on this Blog. Keep your flies in the water.

Sensei John

NOTES:

1. These lakes are part of the Arizona Urban Fishing Program. The program which provides man-made fishing lakes in close proximity to major population centers is celebrating its 25th anniversary.

Please feel free to shop unique Fly Fishing Dojo logo wear by clicking on the “SHOP” tab at the top of this page.

Please feel free to view my other blog dedicated to exploring martial arts ideology and concepts as they can be applied to daily life. You may visit the blog at WWW.SenseiJohn.Wordpress.Com.

JULY, 2010 FLY-FISHING JOURNAL

4 Aug

Arizona, July, 2010, hot, consistent triple digit temperatures, humid, Monsoon season. I was very lucky to be able to average 4 days a week of fishing. I hope the following fishing journal encourages you to beat the heat and wet a fly.

LOWER SALT RIVER.

I have an affinity for the Lower Salt and was able to fish it at least once a week. When I fish the Lower Salt, I use either a 7 ½ foot Cortland Pro Crest rod with # 5 double taper floating line and a 9 foot leader with a 6X tippet or an 8 foot Fenwick Ferrulite Rod throwing the same line and leader. I also fished with a nice 9 foot rod which I recently acquired. I will not provide the specifics of the rod now as I an still field-testing it and will be posting a review of the rod in about 3 weeks. My usual starting points are 1) a quarter mile up river from the first tubing launch point, 2) Sheep Crossing from the Bush Highway bridge to about a mile down river, 3) Coon Bluff and 4) Phon Sutten. The most productive stretch of water for me was the first two locations. Trout were few and far between; however, I had fair catches of decent-sized Bluegill and small to decent small mouth bass. Having said that, due to the heat (low temperatures in the mid-nineties and triple digit high temperatures) fishing was tough. Adding to the overall slow fishing conditions was varying water depth and flow. As you can see from the flow chart obtained from WWW.Watershedmonitor.Com water flows for the month ranged from a low of 300 c.f.s to a high of 1,150 c.f.s The most drastic single day fluctuation was on July 31 when flows ranged from 300 c.f.s. to750 c.f.s. in less than 24 hours. Rough on the fish.

Lower Salter River Flows as recorded by WatershedMonitor.Com

The most interesting aspect of fishing the Lower Salt this past month was the unusual encounters with nature. On several occasions I saw a herd of wild horses in the area of Sheep Crossing.

A small herd of wild horses 7-3-10

I also learned that it is best to avoid fishing the Lower Salt on a hot holiday weekend. The weekend of July 4th I wanted to get in some river fishing. Though I have a few spots that are unaffected by the tubers and kayakers, I learned that my spots are not impervious to law enforcement. I was fishing a deep secluded pool when I began to hear a loud sound, almost like a giant vacuum cleaner coming from down river. The sound was so loud that it drowned out the tuber’s numerous floating boom boxes. These floating radios usually provide a constant cacophony of unsynchronized milieu of rock, rap and reggae music. “Ok“, I thought. I knew my hope for a quiet day on the river was a bit optimistic, but this is loud droning sound was more than a bit out of the ordinary. I looked downstream and to my amazement saw a Maricopa County Sheriff’s Department airboat coming up the river. I watched the patrol boat speed up river. As I stood knee deep in at the base of what was once a quiet pool turned into a churning mass of water, I knew it was time to leave.

MCSO Airboat Crew (stock photo)

As I was packing my equipment into the truck I heard an airborne roar. Upon looking into the blue heavens, my eyes set up not a wondrous Herron, hawk, or even a vulture, rather, it was a Maricopa County Sheriff’s Helicopter patrol. It was good, I guess, to know that the thousands of river-revelers, sans this one fly-fisherman, would be well protected (from themselves) on land, sea and air by the ever vigilant efforts of our fatherly local government agencies.

MCSO Helicopter Patrol

Oh well, I’ll see how the dog days of summer pan out on the Lower Salt in the coming month of August.

VETERNA’S OASIS LAKE, Chandler, AZ (See Note  1)

This lake provided me with regular fishing. I was often able to take an hour or two, hit potential productive spots, many of which are now “favorites” and be back to work all within two and a half hours. The lake, which is a recent addition to the Urban Fishing Program, produced well.

Sunset at Veteran's Oasis Lake, July 1oth

There were consistent catches of bluegill and large mouth bass. I saw several large white amur, in excess of the thirty inch minimum. When fishing this lake, I used a small Fenwick Ferrulite six foot rod ( 2 5/8 rod weight) with 5 weight double taper line. I also used a nine foot 7X tippet to add to the fun. With this set up, the blue gill were fun, but the largemouth bass were a thrill. My fly patterns involved using double nymph and wet fly combinations. The most productive combination was an Apache Lady, # 14 on the head and an Olive Chironomid Pupa, #16 on the tail end. This set up produced the most fish consistently. I had a real exciting catch of a largemouth bass using the Apache Lady with a # 16 Ju-Ju Bee dropper. Size-wise, the fish was only about 11 inches. Fight-wise it was a contender. It took about 8 minutes to work him out of the reeds in which he was hiding with the small Fenwick rod and the 7X tippet.

Bass could not resist the # 16 Ju-Ju Bee (the black dot in the lower jaw)(released unharmed)

Catfish were recently stocked and provided bait fishermen with nice catches. Additionally, it provided me with an important aspect to my fly-fishing. This aspect is the idea that your fishing partner, whether they fly-fish or not, must have the opportunity to catch fish. In my case the catfish provided Di with suitable quarry. 

 

Back home Di lets Chloe inspect her catfish (subsequently breaded & eaten)

WATER RANCH LAKE, Gilbert, AZ  (See Note # 1)

This is another lake that I was able to fish at least once or twice a week. I used the same ultra-light tackle and double nymph or wet fly set-up as described above. Once again, the lake was fertile with Bluegill and small largemouth bass. I say small because the minimum size for keeping a largemouth is 13 inches. Notwithstanding the size limit, it is always best to practice catch and release with the bass as they are only stocked once a year. My average catch was between 11 and 13 inches. But, once again, on a rod that weighs less than 3 ounces, a 7X tippet and a fly that is often a size 16, these fish provide the sought after excitement.

Bass on ultra-light fly tackle and 7X tippet July 17th (released unharmed)

RIVERVIEW LAKE (See Note # 1)

July 30th, I happened to be in Mesa on business. A quick check of my map showed that I would be only 2 miles from this lake. Naturally, that meant the fly-fishing equipment would be packed. I arrived at the lake about 3:00 pm. The wind was blowing strong as a summer monsoon storm front loomed in the distance. I made a quick trip around the lake casting a wooly bugger, size 14 with a Red Ass, size 16 on the tail. After one trip around the lake, about 10 Bluegill succumbed to the mythical Siren’s call of the Red Ass. The next time I find my way out to Mesa, I will again fish this lake in a more calculated manner.

Until my August report, I hope you continue to enjoy the articles I post on this Blog. Keep your flies in the water.

Sensei John

NOTES:

1. These lakes are part of the Arizona Urban Fishing Program. The program which provides man-made fishing lakes in close proximity to major population centers is celebrating its 25th anniversary.

Please feel free to view my other blog dedicated to exploring martial arts ideology and concepts as they can be applied to daily life. You may visit the blog at WWW.SenseiJohn.Wordpress.Com.

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